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Tuesday, 30 June 2015

Aged - Thematic Photography

I could have just stayed in my office for this 'Aged' theme. After all everything will be modern when compared with what normally sits in a saucer on my desk.

Ammonites (Cf to a Biro top)
When it comes to buildings these two are fairly 'aged.'

Church House at the right, Sundial Cottage in the middle
The date on the sundial says 1786. At the left is a modern extension to the cottage.

This looks like a modern cottage


Until you read the plaque on the wall dating it to


Carved stones from the Church of St Martin and St Hilary date back to 810. As St Martin was once a Roman soldier then  parts are truly ancient. Anglo Saxon and Viking stones from the Church from the 200 years before the Norman invasion are on display in a local museum.

St Martin and St Hilary
Next to the entrance porch to the Church stands a gravestone that has seen better days.


I wonder whether worshippers used to bring their horses to church in the days before motor cars.

Horse trough (Or ancient coffin?)

But when it comes to the oldest things I have a small collection to go with the first three fossils you saw.

Large ammonite
That's a 10p coin at the right next to the ammonite from my first picture. The fossil which looks like a hook is a gryphea.

I wonder how many million years it took for the calcite to be deposited in the animal's body cavity.


I've aged enough to be considered an old fossil by some but modesty forbids me from including a picture of myself.

So for more aged items you need to follow the links at Carmi's thematic-photographic-339

8 comments:

Jo said...

Lovely old church and cottages. Do you collect old fossils, the ammonite kind I mean? They certainly did take their horses to church although usually carriage horse, but whether that is a trough or not I wouldn't like to guess.

ifthethunderdontgetya™³²®© said...

I admire your fossil collection, Bob!

The history of that old church is astounding.
~

Max Sartin said...

When it comes to aged buildings you got me beat. Here in the US, my 100 year old home is considered ancient. I love old buildings, and the ones you have here are awesome. Great fossils too.

Bob Scotney said...

Jo - I have accumulated the fossils over 50 years. The large ammonite from an ironstone mine in Lincolnshire courtesy of its geologist, the others from various beaches.

Bob Scotney said...

Jo - I have accumulated the fossils over 50 years. The large ammonite from an ironstone mine in Lincolnshire courtesy of its geologist, the others from various beaches.

Gilly said...

Yep! Your fossils beat the rest of us! I find fossils fascinating, though I've never collected them. and the church is glorious, I think that "trough" might be a coffin as it seems to narrow at one end (where they put the feet!!) And I love those old cottages, would love to see inside them.

Author R. Mac Wheeler said...

One thing we colonist miss out on...your old buildings. We had natives wandering around 20 thousand years ago, but they didn't leave us what your ancestors left you...oh...a few pyramids a few hundred miles south of us...I didn't think about those. *smile*

Carmi Levy said...

North American history can't hold a candle to yours. I just love how you've captured these remarkable structures and artifacts. I can only imagine what it must be like to live Right There, where it's part of your everyday life. How neat is that!