Saturday, 5 February 2011

American Motorists for Sepia Saturday.

I was quite disappointed to discover that a man called Horatio Nelson was not English. Dr Horatio Nelson Jackson was the first man to drive a car across America in 1903.


He named his Winton car the Vermont. He and his co-driver Sewall K Croker acquired a companion during their journey, a pit bull called Bud. The three became quite famous.

Bud in his goggles.

The journey is commemorated on this sign in Vermont:



Earlier this week I was researching dreams and came across a lady, Madame C J Walker who became America's first female self-made millionaire. She was the first in her family to be born free.


The picture must be before 1919 as that was the year Madame Walker died.

Detroit is supposedly the car capital of the world. I wonder whether Madame Walker's and Dr Jackson's cars were made on a production line like this for 1913.



As I've no English content this week I have decided to go back to Amy, the subject of my first Sepia Saturday post. At least I got a British car in this shot from the 1950s (just).


More cars at: Sepia Saturday 60

17 comments:

jakill said...

Fascinating facts and some lovely nostalgia here, Bob.

Karen S. said...

Oh Bud the great doggie....you are adorable...and Michigan is home to so much automobile history....my daddy even worked at the Fisher-Body Plant when he was in high school or around that time...he went to college in Arizona so not sure of the exact years he worked there...but any how what a great automobile history to see! Thanks!

Christine H. said...

I think I need to find out more about Madame Walker. What an interesting post.

imagespast said...

I can't imagine driving any distance with no windscreen - no wonder Bud needed his goggles! Jo

Kristin said...

I wonder if that detroit factory is one that i took pictures of in 1998. A gigantic wreck. a magnificent wreck of a factory. Interesting post.

MuseSwings said...

"Detroit is supposedly the car capital of the world"? Not "supposedly", it IS! I mean was, at one time, for a long time, but now it's not. Not even close. But I will say one thing, the folks from Michigan are faithful to the Detroit brands. So if they could afford to buy a car, which they (we) can't, then Detroit would be the car capital of the world again. I've only owned Detroit cars: Chrysler never figured out how to build a car you could start in the rain. Chevy's were good at stalling. Pontiac and Buick should have had the motto "what's the point". Fords are trustworthy enough. They got Mercury's right though. Those are the best.

Nana Jo said...

Very interesting pictures. Bud was so cute. I especially like the one of Madame Walker and her companions. She must have been quite the woman!

Jayne said...

What great photos, and I'll bet there are some really interesting stories behind those facts. Quite inspiring information! ;)

Lisa B said...

An interesting series of images, the pit bull must have been a softie at heart to allow the goggles to be put on!

TICKLEBEAR said...

Mrs Walker: from freedom to millionaire!! not a bad résume, if you ask me. i'll forgive that bit of chauvinism on your part... yes, Amy saved the day!!
:D~
the dog is a darling, but i found the assembly line most fascinating. such a contrast to all of the robotics they have nowadays...
thanx 4 sharing!!
:)~
HUGZ

Bob Scotney said...

There's a lot about Mrs Walker what perhaps I should have included. She founded and built up a multi-million dollar corporation for African-Americans based on a dream she had. The product she developed cured scalp problems for her and her friends.

TICKLEBEAR said...

indeed, an interesting fact!! a simple idea that made her fortune. who knew??
:D~
HUGZ

Pat transplanted to MN said...

Nice chapter of history there with great photos. Had not known of it, except about Detroit being car capital. Such an adventure for 1903 when I imagine cross country meant dirt roads. Mrs. Walker was really an achiever!

Alan Burnett said...

Ah you take the theme and do it proud Bob. I will treasure the picture of Bud in his goggles.

Tattered and Lost said...

Can't help but think of Steinbeck's "Travels with Charley." I was quite thrilled to see Steinbeck's truck at his museum in Salinas, California. He had built his own camper shell on the back in which he and Charlie travelled. A book worth reading and a museum worth visiting.

Bob Scotney said...

Thanks for the reminder Tattered and Lost. I've been meaning to read "Travels with Charley" for a long time. Won't get to the museum though.

Thanks for all comments everyone.

L. D. Burgus said...

We have a Ford plant building that is still standing today in downtown Des Moines, Iowa. It is now a school building but on the back side you can see the facade of the past. They call it Central Campus. I need to research that and share it. Great post.