Sunday, 8 January 2017

Winter white - Sunday Stamps II

Last year on 6 January, Royal Mail issued a set of stamps commemorating what Sir Edmund Hillary described as 'The Greatest Survival Story of All Time'.


During an attempt to be the first to cross Antarctica, Shackleton and his crew were 80 miles from their destination when their vessel, Endurance, became stuck in sea ice and after four months was crushed.

28 men were left stranded on the ice for another six months having dragged three boats and provisions from the ship.

You may read more about Sir Ernest Shackleton's and the crew's heroic actions leading to their rescue here.

For other winter white scenes check out links at Sunday-Stamps-II.


8 comments:

Eva A. said...

I have received some of them. They look superb on envelopes!

FinnBadger said...

An incredible expedition with perfect stamps.

Hilary Melton-Butcher said...

Hi Bob - it is an extraordinary story ... especially comparing his clothing to that which Roald Amundsen took with him, or the equipment differences ...

Thanks for showing us these ... I really need to learn more ... we had a play here about Shackleton's carpenter (as in woodwork) an essential for a trip like that and back in those days ... but I couldn't quite get my head round it ...

So glad I got to see the stamps ... cheers Hilary

Hilary Melton-Butcher said...

What I meant to add ... apparently he left from Eastbourne ... and went up to London see King George V before he set off ... completely different lives and expectations then ... We have one tiny memory in Shackleton Close, it's not on the front, but is not far from the end of the pier - and the area has changed a little in 100 years ... more of it is built up and been able to be built on - as the seafront contains the same shingle as at Dungeness ...

Cheers!

viridian said...

An incredible story to be sure. And not a man was lost.

Heleen said...

Incredible story indeed, remembered by beautiful stamps.

Jo said...

Interesting stamps and a fascinating story.

Joy said...

I always love Hurley's photographs, even more amazing when one thinks of the conditions they were taken under.