Thursday, 25 July 2013

Heirlooms - Sepia Saturday

Apart from some pieces of my wife's jewelry and some paintings that we have acquired over the years I was initially hard put to come up with anything in our possession that falls into the heirloom category suggested this week.



But then we both came up with what we see every day in our oak dresser and kitchen cabinets.


Royal Doulton Dinner Set (part)
I was not allowed to remove them from the dresser or the cabinet.

Royal Doulton Meat Dish and Tureen
How do I know it's Royal Doulton? I must confess to taking a peek at the markings on the bottom. This is what I found.

Royal Doulton - Burslem - Mark (Lynn Pattern)
John Doulton and his partner had established a pottery in Lambert, South London as early as 1815. In 1877 John and his son Henry purchased an interest in Pinder, Bourne & Company at Nile Street, Burslem in Staffordshire. By all accounts they weren't exactly welcomed as Henry observed, "In their view we Southerners know little or nothing about God and nothing at all about potting. It was at Burslem that Royal Doulton had its origin.

Sir Henry Doulton
The back marks on the pottery enable you to determine its age. The first Burslem mark consisted of the central Doulton Burslem floret with the four interlocking 'Ds.' The coronet was added about 1886 to mark the appointment of Henry Doulton as Potter to HRH The Prince of Wales (later King Edward VII)

This mark continued to be used until 1902.. England was added to the mark  in 1891.


Sir Henry Doulton (1820-1897)
(Statue at Burslem Market Place - by Steve Birks - CC BY-SA 2.0)
A plaque at the rear reads, "This statue was unveiled by Mr Stuart Lyon, Chairman of Royal Doulton Limited, 11 June 1991. Sir Henry Doulton was the first potter to receive the Albert Medal and to be knighted for his services."

The Nile Street factory was closed in 2004 and demolished in 2008, Royal Doulton was taken over by the Waterford Wedgwood Group in 2006.

Now all that remains is to determine where our heirloom goes on our demise!

For other treasured possessions pass over to Sepia-Saturday-187.

26 comments:

Kat Mortensen said...

I took a great deal from this post, Bob as I have a full set of Royal Doulton dishes myself, and am an avid collector of anything "MADE IN ENGLAND" from the potteries of old.

We also have a full set of "Wickerdale" Spode that is my mom's. I may need to jump in to the Sepia Saturday round. I didn't think I had anything to declare, but you have proved me wrong!

ifthethunderdontgetya™³²®© said...

You had to remove them to take the picture of the markings, right?

It's o.k...we won't tell! They are very nice.
~

Lovely's Blot said...

Do you ever use them? Probably not I bet!

Bob Scotney said...

@Lovely's Blot - They are used but only on very special occasions.

Jo said...

If you don't use them you should, they were made to be used an enjoyed not stuck in a cabinet.

Love Royal Doulton, didn't know they had been taken over by Spode. I used to have a a lot of Doulton figures but sold them when we moved to the States.

Little Nell said...

Heirlooms they are indeed, It's not everyone who has Royal Doulton in their cabinet. Thank goodness they survived being upturned for identification purposes!

Brett Payne said...

I must confess that I too "know little or nothing about God and nothing at all about potting." However, we do own a jug made for an ancestor in the early 1800s that I must investigate further some time. Unfortunately, it doesn't have a handy maker's mark on the bottom like yours.

ScotSue said...

Thank you for the unusual "take" on this week's prompt. I have always loved blue and white china and your photographs showed off its charm so well. I knew nothing about Mr Doulton so enjoyed reading about him too.

Wendy said...

I'll be glad to be named as recipient of your fine heirlooms if you care to change your will. My china is by Royal Doulton, a newer pattern for sure, but not nearly as grand as yours.

The Silver Fox said...

I don't own too many family heirlooms. Wish I had more.

Deb Gould said...

I have a couple of pieces of Doulton and hang onto them simply because they're so beautiful...and because they're "family."
Nice post!

Karen S. said...

Oh Bob, this was really an interesting twist. What a fine collection, a real family treasure indeed!

Alex Daw said...

Great post. I too am an afficianado of blue and white china.

Colleen G. Brown Pasquale said...

Beautiful china! I'd be afraid to use it.

Mike Brubaker said...

A very original spin on this weekend's theme, Bob. I too have a china service that is only for display and which we (meaning me) are not allowed to use. But I think good plate, and silver too for that matter, ought to be used to be really enjoyed. I doubt my son will appreciate this heirloom when the time comes, as he has never used it either.

Kristin said...

I feel the same about using china and silver but that is why I do not have any old china. Not even my childhood tea set which was used by my daughter and smashed to bits over the years. Your's may be the only way to save it. Silver is more forgiving.

barbara and nancy said...

It's amazing from "knowing nothing about potting" to being the potter to the Prince of Wales. That a great example of learning on the job. You have beautiful pieces.
Nancy

Joan said...

Your post on the Royal Dalton china was a great take on the theme. I have a set of hand-painted Spode which was handed down from my aunt. On special occasions (Christmas, Easter, and any family gathering). she loved setting her table with her Spode. I must confess, I have never used it in the 30 years that the set has been in my possession. A bit to "dainty"for my lifestyle -- and the replacement cost is absolutely astounding, as it has been out of production for almost as long as I have owned it. Thanks for reminding me of such a treasure, handed down.

Postcardy said...

I have a few small Royal Doulton character jugs. My father had a big collection of them which was started by a gift from my mother before they were married.

Hazel Ceej said...

Not allowed to remove them but I'm glad you got to take a peek at the markings and show us :) They are really beautiful!

Hazel

Liz Needle said...

Beautiful dinner set. I love Royal Doulton and had a large collection of animals when I was younger - my daughter now has them. Have to say I prefer your dinner set.

Jackie van Bergen said...

I heard from somewhere that china NEEDS to be used - something about needing to be 'washed up', ie immersed in water every so often.
I must go and find where I got that from - maybe mum?

diane b said...

Wow not many people have Royal Doulton dinner set. It looks as beautiful as ever. Interesting history of Doulton too.

boundforoz said...

My mother gave my daughter what was left of her Royal Doulton set and over the years my daughter has built it up again from second hand shops. Now any special meal at my daughters is like reliving my childhood and Sunday lunch

boundforoz said...

Great post. My daughter has the remains of my mother's Royal Doulton dinner set and over the years has built it up again from second hand shops. Now a meal at my daughter's place is like travelling back in time to Sunday lunch as a child.

TICKLEBEAR said...

Great to read again about Doulton. I have a collection of books from the Smitsonian and one is about the history of porcelain. Didn't know Wedgewood had taken Doulton over.

Nice to see someone looking into vintage objects, like I sometimes did.

Great post!!
:)~
HUGZ