Friday, 10 May 2013

School Days - Sepia Saturday

As chemistry was my favourite subject at school I thought this week would be ideal for ma as soon as I saw the laboratory photo.

However when I looked through my photo archive it was more difficult than that. From the age of 11 I went to Stamford School in Lincolnshire, then an independent school, Now it it is part of Stamford Endowed Schools along with what back then was Stamford High School for girls.. [Note to Facebook - Stamford School, Stamford, Lincolnshire, England - NOT Stamford School, Lahore, Pakistan as you insist it is on my profile and won't let me correct]

Stamford School & School Chapel
The buildings are situated on St Paul's Street; on the other side of the street are more school buildings.

Brazenose House - 2007
(Richard Croft - CC BY-SA 2.0 - Geograph Project Collection)

Brazenose was built in c 1688 and rebuilt in 1723 and is now part of the Stamford Endowed Schools campus. In my day the upper floor contained the Staff Room and class rooms; the two bottom windows on the right were those for the School Prefects' Study. The entrance at the right hand end led down to Brazenose gardens. 

Later in 1957, two years after I left, a new science block was built at the bottom of that same entrance. Annoyingly, for me, the photos of the opening of the block and one of my old chemistry master in the lab are copyright protected on the members only part of the School website

Major Lamb (Algy) to us was the one who suggest that I go one to his old university at St Andrews. [Note to Facebook - In St Andrews, Fife, Scotland NOT South Carolina] St Andrews University is 600 years old this year.

St Salvator's Hall -1956
I'm perched on the railing on the top floor of the men's hall of residence; you can't see it in this shot but that is the North Sea behind the far hedge,

Not to be thwarted I managed to find a shot of a St Andrews lab that did not exist while I was there.

Nuclear Resonance Lab, St Andrews - 2009
(Shandchem from Scotland - CC BY 2.0)
Finally, definitely before my time, I finish with a shot of Paris from the Scientific American Supplement - Author L Page.

Drawing of the Lab of the School of Physics & Chemistry
Paris - 1884

For more of the best days of your life, schools, laboratories  - whatever, cross over to Sepia-saturday-176.

20 comments:

Postcardy said...

That's a nice photo of you. It's ridiculous that Facebook won't let you correct your school information!

Hilary Melton-Butcher said...

Hi Bob .. fascinating shots - loved seeing Stamford and then St Andrews and those labs ... I never really got to grips with Chemistry! I guess we were lucky to have labs and be able to do chemistry, physics and biology ..

Now you tell us about the North Sea - yes I can envisage it .. cheers Hilary

barbara and nancy said...

What beautiful schools you went to. the first one looks more like a cathedral. I wonder what the one in Pakistan looks like!
Nancy

Jo said...

I lived in Brigg, Lincolnshire for a while, Stamford looks a typical English school, bit like Riddlesworth Hall in Norfolk where I boarded for a few years.

JO ON FOOD, MY TRAVELS AND A SCENT OF CHOCOLATE

Nigel Aspdin (Derby, UK) said...

We used to go to the George at Stamford for Sunday lunch when my parents came to take me out for the day from Oundle ! So actually all those lovely old buildings of the area in the local Jurassic limestone, contrary to Barbara and Nancy's comment above, leave me with mixed feelings of both good days and loneliness of a boarder.

Mike Brubaker said...

Chemistry study always seemed like advance cooking, which I am not very good at either. I know enough in both to not poison myself (or others).

As to Facebook, perhaps alumni in Lahore and South Carolina are frustrated too.

Kristin said...

Stamford School, Lahore, Pakistan
has a fb page if you want to take a look.

https://www.facebook.com/pages/Stamford-Grammar-School/108105706018767

Liz Needle said...

What beautiful school buildings. So much nicer (but far worse resourced) than the modern ones.

Alex Daw said...

I love the look of Brazenose House!

Wendy said...

Maybe because I was an English major more comfortable with the liberal arts than the sciences, I find chemistry labs fascinating. My daughter is a chemistry professor and is very proud to show off her lab. A lab looks so dangerous.

Your school building was beautiful!

Eugenia O'Neal said...

Are you quite sure it's not in Lahore? Everything looks vaguely Pakistani to me.
:)

Sharon said...

It looks beautiful and prestigious.

Kathy Morales said...

Beautiful old school buildings and a great shot of you!

Hazel Ceej said...

Wow you like Chemistry - I'm impressed. Those are beautiful school buildings, and you look great!

Pat transplanted to MN said...

Bob, this shows how wrong Facebook and the automatic addresses that so many internet "e" things add although incorrectly..I have run into that too, most recently in Facebook where I noted "retired" and on my profile it connected me to a company in INDIANA which I'd never heard of.. Your photos and writing made me think about those venerable buildings that remain functioning, while here they tear down the schools after not even 100 years old because they are not considered modern enough, nor useful for today's "education."

Karen S. said...

You look great Bob, and I just know you had the time of your life. Those were the days, of course you have found other interests now, but some of those school memories are of such a wonderful time! Great post and photos too!

Dakota Boo said...

Nice take on the theme.

whowerethey said...

Excellent post! I enjoyed seeing you in your "salad days" whatever that means, haha.

TICKLEBEAR said...

Remarkable architecture for both buildings. The computer tower didn't scream 1950s so we would have guessed this was AFTER your time there.

So you studied in Lahore, eh?!?
Just delete your school info on your profile, and reset it to the proper coordinates. Don't try to edit, remove and enter the new info.
:)~
HUGZ

Brett Payne said...

Good to hear that you enjoyed chemistry. The laboratories didn't seem to have changed a great deal between 1884 and when I was at school.